http://BCGRC.IN
http://BCGRC.IN

Checking delivery availability...

background-sm
Search
3
4

Updates found with 'speech therapists'

Page 1 1

Updates found with ''

Harvard medical school Post stroke: Addressing thinking and memory problemsA stroke can disrupt your ability to think clearly and can cause problems with your memory, attention, and organizational abilities. Both speech and occupational therapists work with people to improve these areas and to develop strategies to compensate for problems — for example, using cue cards and detailed lists or simplifying daily routines.Coping with spatial neglect. One fairly common effect of stroke is called "neglect." This is a lack of awareness of one side of the body and the space around that side of the body. The left side is more commonly affected than the right. If you have neglect, you may bump into things on your left without noticing them, shave or apply makeup only on the right side of your face, or eat food on only the right side of your plate.Skin Care and RepairProtect your brain: That’s the strategy that Harvard doctors recommend in this report on preventing and treating stroke. Whether you’ve already had a mini-stroke or a major stroke, or have been warned that your high blood pressure might cause a future stroke, Stroke: Diagnosing, treating, and recovering from a "brain attack" provides help and advice.If you have this problem, occupational and speech therapists will cue you to look frequently toward your neglected side and then teach you to cue yourself. One example: A red line down the left margin of the page you are reading may help remind you to look all the way to the marker so you see all the words on that line. A variety of software programs and games can also help train people to pay attention to the things on the neglected side. Caregivers and family members can help by setting important objects (food, writing implements) on the person's neglected side to train him or her to focus more on that side. Prism glasses — which are shaped in a way that changes the focus point of your eyes — can be helpful to shift your view more toward the neglected side.To learn more about strokes and how they can affect you, read Stroke: Diagnosing, treating, and recovering from a "brain attack", a Special Health Report from Harvard Medical School.
Send Enquiry
Read More
Harvard Medical SchoolControlling your weight is key to lowering stroke riskThere is a lot you can do to lower your chances of having a stroke. Even if you've already had a stroke or TIA ("mini-stroke"), you can take steps to prevent another.Controlling your weight is an important way to lower stroke risk. Excess pounds strain the entire circulatory system and can lead to other health conditions, including high blood pressure, diabetes, high cholesterol, and obstructive sleep apnea. But losing as little as 5% to 10% of your starting weight can lower your blood pressure and other stroke risk factors.Protect your brain: That’s the strategy that Harvard doctors recommend in this report on preventing and treating stroke. Whether you’ve already had a mini-stroke or a major stroke, or have been warned that your high blood pressure might cause a future stroke, Stroke: Diagnosing, treating, and recovering from a "brain attack" provides help and advice.Of course, you'll need to keep the weight off for good, not just while you're on a diet. The tips below can help you shed pounds and keep them off:Move more. Exercise is one obvious way to burn off calories. But another approach is to increase your everyday activity wherever you can — walking, fidgeting, pacing while on the phone, taking stairs instead of the elevator.Skip the sipped calories. Sodas, lattes, sports drinks, energy drinks, and even fruit juices are packed with unnecessary calories. Worse, your body doesn't account for them the way it registers solid calories, so you can keep chugging them before your internal "fullness" mechanism tells you to stop. Instead, try unsweetened coffee or tea, or flavor your own sparkling water with a slice of lemon or lime, a sprig of fresh mint, or a few raspberries.Eat more whole foods. If you eat more unprocessed foods — such as fruits, vegetables, and whole grains — you'll fill yourself up on meals that take a long time to digest. Plus, whole foods are full of vitamins, minerals, and fiber and tend to be lower in salt — which is better for your blood pressure, too.Find healthier snacks. Snack time is many people's downfall — but you don't have to skip it as long as you snack wisely. Try carrot sticks as a sweet, crunchy alternative to crackers or potato chips, or air-popped popcorn (provided you skip the butter and salt and season it with your favorite spices instead). For a satisfying blend of carbs and protein, try a dollop of sunflower seed butter on apple slices.For more information on lifestyle changes you can make to help prevent a stroke, buy Stroke: Diagnosing, treating, and recovering from a "brain attack, " a Special Health Report from Harvard Medical School.Stroke: Know when to act, and act quicklyIdentifying and treating a stroke as quickly as possible can save brain cells, function, and lives. Everyone should know the warning signs of a stroke and when to get help fast.The warning signs of a stroke can begin anywhere from a few minutes to days before a stroke actually occurs. The National Stroke Association has devised the FAST checklist to help determine whether a person is having a stroke.Act FASTIf the answer to any of the questions below is yes, there's a high probability that the person is having a stroke.Face: Ask the person to smile. Does one side of the face droop?Arms: Ask the person to raise both arms. Does one arm drift downward?Speech: Ask the person to repeat a simple sentence. Are the words slurred? Does he or she fail to repeat the sentence correctly?Time: If the answer to any of these questions is yes, time is important! Call the doctor or get to the hospital fast. Brain cells are dying.When stroke symptoms occur, quick action is vital. If you think you or someone with you is having a stroke, call the doctor. Ideally, the person affected should be taken to a hospital emergency room that has expertise and experience in treating stroke as it occurs (called acute stroke). If you or someone you love is at high risk for having a stroke, you should know the name and location of the nearest hospital that specializes in treating acute stroke.The goal of stroke treatment is to restore blood circulation before brain tissue dies. To prevent brain cell death that is significant enough to cause disability, treatment is most effective if it starts within 60 minutes of the onset of symptoms. But it can still be very effective if given within 3 hours of symptom onset.An important goal of ongoing stroke research is to find treatments that can buy time by protecting the person's brain until blood circulation is restored, which can increase the chances of survival and decrease the chances of disability.
Send Enquiry
Read More
Harvard Men's Health WatchHearing loss a possible risk factor for dementiaIn the journalsPublished: March, 2018Older adults who develop hearing loss are more likely to experience greater cognitive decline and develop dementia than their counterparts without hearing problems, according to a meta-analysis published online Dec. 7, 2017, by JAMA Otolaryngology — Head and Neck Surgery. Researchers examined data from 36 studies including more than 20, 000 people who underwent both cognitive evaluations and hearing tests. Those with age-related hearing loss were more likely to have cognitive impairment or a diagnosis of dementia.The study found a small but statistically meaningful association between hearing loss and a variety of specific cognitive abilities, including executive function, memory, processing speed, and visuospatial ability (how you recognize shapes and sizes and estimate the distance between two objects). The association between hearing loss and weaker cognitive skills was still strong even after accounting for risk factors like high blood pressure and smoking.It is not yet known how hearing loss may be related to cognitive decline and dementia. The researchers speculated that these abilities may share a common neural pathway. For instance, hearing loss may require increased mental energy to perceive speech, which leaves fewer mental resources available for other cognitive processes like memory. There also may be an indirect link. For example, hearing loss can lead to greater social isolation, which can increase the risk of cognitive problems.
Send Enquiry
Read More
5 exercises to improve hand mobilityIf you find daily tasks difficult to do because you suffer from stiffness, swelling, or pain in your hands, the right hand mobility exercises can help get you back in motion.Therapists usually suggest specific exercises depending on your particular hand or wrist condition. Some help increase a joint's range of motion or lengthen the muscle and tendons via stretching. Other exercises strengthen muscles around a joint to generate more power or to build greater endurance.Range-of-motion hand mobility exercises you can do at homeYour muscles and tendons move the joints through arcs of motion, such as when you bend and straighten your fingers. If your normal range of motion is impaired — if you can't bend your thumb without pain, for example — you may have trouble doing ordinary things like opening a jar.These exercises move your wrist and fingers through their normal ranges of motion and require all the hand's tendons to perform their specific functions. They should be done slowly and deliberately, to avoid injury. If you feel numbness or pain during or after exercising, stop and contact your doctor.Below are five easy-to-do range-of-motion hand mobility exercises. Hold each position for 5–10 seconds. Do 10 repetitions of each exercise at a time. Repeat three times a day.1. Wrist extension and flexionPlace your forearm on a table on a rolled-up towel for padding with your hand hanging off the edge of the table, palm down. Move the hand upward until you feel a gentle stretchReturn to the starting position.Repeat the same motions with the elbow bent at your side, palm facing up.2. Wrist supination/pronationStand or sit with your arm at your side with the elbow bent to 90 degrees, palm facing down.Rotate your forearm, so that your palm faces up and then down.3. Wrist ulnar/radial deviationSupport your forearm on a table on a rolled-up towel for padding or on your knee, thumb upward.Move the wrist up and down through its full range of motion.4. Thumb flexion/extensionBegin with your thumb positioned outward.Move the thumb across the palm and back to the starting position.5. Hand/finger tendon glideStart with the fingers extended straight out.Make a hook fist; return to a straight hand.Make a full fist; return to a straight hand.Make a straight fist; return to a straight hand.For more information on the causes and treatment of hand pain, and strengthening strategies for hands, buy Healthy Hands, a Special Health Report from Harvard Medical School.
Send Enquiry
Read More
Page 1 0.4